Community Updates

Interview with Phil(Phil Makes Things)

Interview with Phil(Phil Makes Things)

In this post we like to introduce our community member Phil from Phil Makes Things from England. We have asked him a few questions about himself and his hobby. These where his answers!


Please introduce yourself to our readers: Where are you from? What do you do when you’re not in the workshop, and where can we find you on the web?

Hello, and thank you for inviting me to introduce myself to the EWC!

I’m Phil Jarrett, from Bristol, a city in the south west of England in the UK. I’m on the web in most places as Phil Makes Things.

Woodworking & making in general is very much a part-time hobby for me. For 40 hours a week I sit at a computer in an office as a systems administrator for a college, I also do Audio / Visual installations and am the resident photography expert (digital and wet process).

I mainly put things I’m working on up on Instagram – as well as anything else I find interesting, or maybe the people that follow me will.
instagram.com/philmakesthings

And my build videos go on YouTube
youtube.com/philmakesthings

I’m not a heavy Facebook user, but you might see me floating about in the I Like To Make Stuff, Makers on Youtube and WoodWorkingUK groups.

How old are you and for how long have you been practicing woodworking as a hobby?

I’m 39 years old, and have been around woodworking my whole life, but have only really been practicing for the last two years or so. Before I got into woodworking, I’ve been a huge proponent of the make-do-and-mend ideal. If something is broken I’ll certainly try my best to mend it before buying something new! My father was an engineer and very good woodworker – I have inherited most of this old tools – and added many of my own. I still have many things to learn…

How did you come to do woodworking and what’s your motivation to practice this hobby?

I do it because it’s a complete antithesis to what I do all day at work, and I love working with my hands. It’s complete escapism from the tech world. For most of a week I’m in an almost entirely digital landscape, but in the workshop the only thing digital is the camera. I very rarely make any plans beyond a sketch on paper and an idea of how I want something to look when finished, and everything else is hands on.

Some might call it therapy. I don’t know about that, but I find it very relaxing, despite it something being frustrating, and at this time of year very cold in the workshop (I’d like to install a wood burning stove, but the local laws prevent it).

Another motivation is to make things for our home that will last a long time. Most of the things I make are a reaction to a need; be it a fruit basket, a blanket box or a coat stand… if we need something, I’d rather make it than buying something new.  I’m a big believer in reusing materials; there is a wealth of used wood that only needs a little cleaning up or paint removing to be used again for something else. That’s got to be better than cutting down trees? I can’t walk past a skip without peering in to see if there’s anything I can use – but always ask before you take something!

Why do you share your projects on the web?

Mainly for the fun of it. The first thing I put on my YouTube channel was a concrete USB hub as part of a challenge, and the response I got from that was very positive (it’s my most watched video!) and it only spurs me on to make more. I find the maker community on pretty much all social platforms a very welcoming place for people of all skill levels, and it’s nice to get feedback from like-minded people, both praise and constructive criticism on how something could have been done differently.

What photo/video equipment do you use and why? If you make videos, what’s your typical workflow for a video?

I use a Nikon d5100 that’s technically broken – it will shoot video but the shutter is broken so it won’t take pictures and more. There’s a distinct knack to making it work – I have to hold my hand over the lens in bright conditions before starting to record, otherwise it won’t work… but otherwise, I’m very happy with the results, but I will upgrade to a non-broken camera sometime in the future.. I use Final Cut Pro X to edit.

Generally, I add footage to a project timeline as I make it, I don’t wait until the project is finished before I start editing. I make a rough cut of all the footage I want to use, then spend a few hours editing it down, revising, and adding a voiceover if the video needs it. Like the woodworking I do, it’s something I need to spend more time doing and making it a bit neater! Practice makes perfect – I’m the kind of person that leans through doing rather than studying books or videos – but I read and watch a lot for inspiration on what to do next.

Do you have a favourite tool? If so, what do you like about it?

That’s a really hard question. I love using my father’s hand-planes which I have restored and use all the time, but at the moment I’d have to say my favorite tool is the track saw. I don’t have space for a table saw, but the track saw allows me to make repeatable cuts with a good straight edge, and they’re coming down in price to the point where it’s available to almost every budget.


Thanks for these insights and for your time! Happy woodworking!

Patrick – PaddysWoodshop (Community Admin)

Winner of the Project of the month: November 2017

Winner of the Project of the month: November 2017

With the most votes, the winner of November 2017 is foxtail_woodworks

 

Background story by black_forest_woodworker

 

Here’s his background story of the project – first in German,  further down in English.

Wow, erst mal danke an alle die für meinen Schwipbogen gestimmt haben, ich hab die Nominierung garnicht mitbekommen 🙈😅.
Ja wie kam es zu dem Projekt, jeder der meinen Instagramfeed verfolgt, weis das ich gerne mit der Dekupiersäge arbeite und kennt vielleicht auch die anderen Dekobögen die ich schon gemacht habe. Diese haben meiner Mutter so gut gefallen, das sie sich zum Geburtstag auch so einen Bogen gewünscht hat.
Jetzt wollte ich nicht noch einmal das selbe machen, also habe ich im Internet mal ein wenig gesucht.
Gewünscht waren ein weihnachtliches Motiv und eine Beleuchtung. Nach einiger Zeit bin ich auf die REGU-Laubsägevorlage „Großes Waldhaus“ gestoßen, welches mir auf Anhieb gut gefallen hat.
Also Vorlage aufs Holz übertragen und angefangen. Einige Wochen! und Sägeblätter später waren die Einzelteile ausgeschnitten und alles geschliffen. Die ganzen kleinen Ausschnitte zu schleifen hat die meiste Zeit in Anspruch genommen. Allein ein äußerer Bogen hat 87 Bohrungen/Ausschnitte.
Für mich war jedoch die Elektrik absolutes Neuland, was auch einiges an Zeit in Anspruch genommen hat. Letztendlich habe ich mich für 3,5 Volt Birnchen mit entsprechendem Trafo entschlossen. Beim Zusammenbau gab‘s keine weiteren Schwierigkeiten, da die Vorlagen sehr passgenau waren. Zuvor wurden die Einzelteile noch angepinselt, bei dem mich meine Frau und Tochter immer tatkräftig unterstützen.
Fertig war der Schwibbogen.
Fazit:
Trotz der vielen Arbeiten an der Dekupiersäge habe ich einiges dazugelernt.
Nichts ist unmöglich, dauert nur länger…
Damit wünsche ich allen eine besinnliche Vorweihnachtszeit, ein Frohes Fest und einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr mit vielen neuen, interessanten und herausfordernden Projekten.

Gruß Sebastian

 

English version of black_forest_woodworker’s story

 

Wow, first of all thanks to all who voted for my candle arch, I did not even get the nomination 🙈😅.

Yes, how did the project come about? Everyone who follows my Instagram feed knows that I like to work with the scroll saw and maybe also knows the other deco sheets that I have already done. My mother liked them so much, that she wanted to have one as a birthday present.

Now I did not want to do the same again, so I searched the internet a bit.

Wanted were a Christmas theme and lighting. After some time I came across the REGU-jigsaw template “Big Forest House”, which I liked right away.

So transfered the template to the wood and got started. Some weeks! and saw blades later, the items were cut out and all ground. It took most of the time to grind all the small cutouts. An outer arch already has 87 holes / cutouts.

For me, however, the electrical system was uncharted territory, which also took a lot of time. Finally, I decided to use 3.5 volt bulbs with the appropriate transformer. When assembling, there were no further difficulties, since the templates were very accurate. Previously, the items were still painted, in which my wife and daughter always actively support me.

Done was the candle arch.

Conclusion:

Despite the many work on the scroll saw I have learned a lot.

Nothing is impossible, it just takes longer …

I wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year with many new, interesting and challenging projects.

Greetings Sebastian

 

A special Thanks to beaver.woodcraft for translating

 

Project of the month: November 2017

Project of the month: November 2017

This is the seventh post of our monthly series “Project of the month”.

This month, “X-MAS”

The vote will run for about a week and then we’re going to announce the project of the month. The winning maker will give you some behind-the-scences information about the project.

You can bring projects to our attention in two different ways:

We’re going to choose from those nominations but we can’t guarantee that any of them will come up in a vote because we have no idea how many projects will be sent in. The projects don’t have to be posted in that particular month.

_______________________________________________________________________

So for November 2017, here are the three candidates

foxtail_woodworks: Schwibbogen
Palettendealer: Weihnachtsbaum
Created.by.Woodyduck: Kerzenständer

Which of the following projects is your Project of the Month (November 2017)
  • foxtail_woodworks 65%, 13 votes
    13 votes 65%
    13 votes - 65% of all votes
  • Created.by.Woodyduck 30%, 6 votes
    6 votes 30%
    6 votes - 30% of all votes
  • Palettendealer 5%, 1 vote
    1 vote 5%
    1 vote - 5% of all votes
Total Votes: 20
05.12.2017 - 13.12.2017
Voting is closed
© Kama
Interview with Douglas (The_Holzwurm)

Interview with Douglas (The_Holzwurm)

In this post we like to introduce our community member Douglas (the_holzwurm) from Texas. We have asked him a few questions about himself and his hobby. These where his answers!


Please introduce yourself to our readers: Where are you from? What do you do when you’re not in the workshop, and where can we find you on the web?

Hi, my name is Doug Vasalech,

I am currently from Texas but I was born in Bad Cannstadtt (Stuttgart). When I am not in my workshop, I am usually working in our yard, walking the dog in the park or just being lazy on the couch. I can be found on Instagram @theholzwurm or Facebook (I do not access this much as there is too much drama on it)

How old are you and for how long have you been practicing woodworking as a hobby?

I am 55 years old, I started buying tools in 2016 in anticipation of doing wood working as a hobby, I did not actually start to build things until early 2017.

How did you come to do woodworking and what’s your motivation to practice this hobby?

I retired on 14 December 2012 at age 52, I was a workaholic and my wife told me to get a hobby. I tried to get interested in N scale trains, but this was short lived. I decided I wanted to use my hands and therefore, I started to tinker with wood.

Why do you share your projects on the web?

I share my projects online to inspire others and a means to create a digital footprint for my children and grandchildren. They live in California! Instagram is a means to stay in contact besides using a telephone.

What photo/video equipment do you use and why? If you make videos, what’s your typical workflow for a video?

I currently use an Iphone 6 to take pictures most of the time, I do not have a YouTube channel at this time as I do not have the skills to produce videos.

Do you have a favorite tool? If so, what do you like about it?

This is a very hard question as I like all my tools! If I singled out one the others might get jealous, anyway I would say my German hand plane, I received it from my sister who lives in Berlin, Germany. This hand plane feels good in the hand and I was able to sharpen and set up the blade very easily.

Doug

 

Social Media Channels of Douglas


Thanks for these insights and for your time! Happy woodworking!

Thomas – HolzwurmTom (Community Admin)

Winner of the Project of the month: October 2017

Winner of the Project of the month: October 2017

With the most votes, the winner of October 2017 is black_forest_woodworker

 

Background story by black_forest_woodworker

 

Here’s his background story of the project – first in German,  further down in English.

Ich wollte mir eine Kappsäge zulegen die einen festen Platz in der Werkstatt hat, aber dennoch mobil bleibt und auf die Seite geschoben werden kann um zum Beispiel an Material zu kommen, dass hinter der Maschine lagert. Da zu diesem Zeitpunkt meine Handwerkzeuge verstreut in der Werkstatt in verschiedenen Schubladen lagerten und keinen zentralen, festen Platz hatten wo diese gut zu erreichen waren, kam mir der Gedanke dieses zu kombinieren. Also musste ein Werkstattwagen her, der nicht zu hoch war um noch bequem an der Kappsäge sägen zu können.

Nachdem ich mich entschieden hatte welche Säge es werden sollte waren die groben Masse bekannt und ich konnte mit der genauen Planung beginnen. Als Material habe ich mich für 18mm Dreischichtplatte entschieden, da dieses sich gut verarbeiten lässt und später geölt ein schönes Bild ergibt. Nachdem ich mehrere Zeichnungen erstellt hatte und die genauen Masse feststanden konnte ich mit dem Bau beginnen. In der Zwischenzeit war auch die Festool KS 120 angekommen. Die Säge musste bis zur Fertigstellung noch einen Platz auf der Werkbank finden. Diese konnte auch gleich zum Einsatz kommen, um zum Beispiel die Leisten der Einfassung der Deckelplatte anzupassen. Hauptsächlich habe ich die Einzelteile mit der Tauchsäge und der Führungsschiene zugeschnitten. Beim Bau des Korpusses und der Schubladen konnte ich meine ersten Erfahrungen mit der Dominofräse sammeln. Da der Werkstattwagen mein erstes Möbelprojekt mit Domino war. Durch diese konnte ich den Großteil des Korpusses mit Dübel Verbindungen realisieren und musste keine sichtbaren Schrauben einsetzen. Die Einzelteile der Schubladen habe ich auch mit Domino Dübeln verbunden. Die Schubladen wurden dann mit Kugelvollauszügen im Korpus angebracht. Die beiden Fächer für die Systainer sind so konstruiert das ein Systainer der Größe drei oder zwei der Größe eins Platz darin finden. Zum Schluss nach dem alles geschliffen war, habe ich die gesamte Oberfläche zweimal mit Hartwachsöl behandelt, um das Holz zu schützen und eine ansprechende Oberfläche zu erhalten.

Nach jetzt nun schon längerem arbeiten mit und auf dem Werkstattwagen, bin ich nach wie vor absolut zufrieden. Die Kappsäge ist schnell Einsatz bereit und auch die Handwerkzeuge sind übersichtlich verstaut und leicht zu erreichen.

 

 

 

English version of black_forest_woodworker’s story

 

I wanted to buy a miter saw that has solid place in my shop but i also wanted it to be mobile, so i could roll it away and get to stuff that is stored behind it. At this time my handtools had no certain central place in my shop that was easy to reach and were laying in drawers all over my shop, so i had the idea of combining both.
So there was the need of a cart that has a nice height, so cutting on the miter saw would be comfortable.
When i had decided which saw i would buy, i knew the most measurements and could start with the planning process.
For material i decided to use three-layer plate with a thickness of 18 mm, because it is easy to work with and has a nice finish after oiling. After i had some sketches and the exact measurements i could start building. In the meantime the Festool Kapex KS 120 had arrived. Till the project was finished the saw had its place on my workbench.
It has found its use immediately as i cutted the bars of the frame for the top. Most parts were cut with the plunge saw and a guiding rail.
In building the corpus and the drawers i could make my first experiences with the domino dowel jointer. The cart was my first furniture project with the Domino. With it i could do most connections without using visuable screws. The parts of the drawers were also connected with dominos. The drawers were build into the corpus with ball-bearing slides.
Both boxes for the systainers are build to hold either one systainer size 3 or two systainer size 1.
After sanding i finished everything two times with hardwax oil to protect the wood and give it a nice finish.
After working some time with the cart i am still happy with how it turned out. The miter saw is instantly ready for work and all the handtools are stored nicely and easy to reach.

 

 

A special Thanks to beaver.woodcraft for translating
Project of the month: October 2017

Project of the month: October 2017

This is the sixth post of our monthly series “Project of the month”.

This month, “Utility for the shop”

The vote will run for about a week and then we’re going to announce the project of the month. The winning maker will give you some behind-the-scences information about the project.

You can bring projects to our attention in two different ways:

We’re going to choose from those nominations but we can’t guarantee that any of them will come up in a vote because we have no idea how many projects will be sent in. The projects don’t have to be posted in that particular month.

_______________________________________________________________________

So for October 2017, here are the three candidates

black_forest_woodworker : Unter/Werkstatt Wagen für die Kapex KS 120

holly_woodworking : Frästisch

pepes_kellerwerkstatt : Unterschrank für Metabo Abricht-Dickenhobel

 

Which of the following projects is your Project of the Month (October 2017)
  • black_forest_woodworker 58%, 11 votes
    11 votes 58%
    11 votes - 58% of all votes
  • holly_woodworking 26%, 5 votes
    5 votes 26%
    5 votes - 26% of all votes
  • pepes_kellerwerkstatt 16%, 3 votes
    3 votes 16%
    3 votes - 16% of all votes
Total Votes: 19
30.10.2017 - 06.11.2017
Voting is closed
© Kama

 

Interview mit Klaus (Klausis Paletten Art) 

Interview mit Klaus (Klausis Paletten Art) 

In diesem Beitrag möchten wir unser Community Mitglied Klaus (Klausis Paletten Art)  vorstellen. Wir haben ihm ein paar Fragen zu sich selbst und seinem Hobby gestellt. Das hat er uns geantwortet!


Stelle Dich bitte kurz den Lesern vor: Woher kommst Du, was machst Du, wenn Du nicht in der Werkstatt bist, und wo im Netz kann man Dich finden?

Hallo erst einmal 3 Fragen in einen Satz … krass ist ja witziger als ein Überraschungsei.

  1. Teil
    Ich komme aus Holzminden, das liegt im schönen Weserbergland in
    Niedersachen.
  2. Teil
    Also wenn ich nicht in der Werkstatt bin:

    • bin ich “normal ” am Arbeiten in der Glashütte in Holzminden und das schon seit mehr als 25 Jahren
    • oder ich bin mit meiner Familie unterwegs,
    • oder ich gehe meinen anderen Hobby dem Geocachen nach,
    • oder ich sitze Abends vor dem Laptop und versuche mich im Selbststudium mit CAD und 3D-Druck und 2,5D-Fräsen (sehr interessantes Thema finde ich).
  3. Teil
    Man kann mich auf Instagram @klausispalettenart  auf meiner Webseite www.KlausSchaefer68.de und bei Facebook @KlausiPalettenArt finden.

Wie alt bist Du und seit wann betreibst Du Holzwerken als Hobby?

Ich bin 48 Jahre alt und das Hobby Holzwerken betreibe ich seit Februar / März
2016.

Wie bist Du zum Holzwerken gekommen und was ist Deine Motivation, dieses Hobby zu betreiben?

Meine Frau konnte den alten Wohnzimmertisch nicht mehr sehen und hat bei einen Second Hand-Laden einen Tisch aus Paletten gesehen, dieser sollte 499 Euro kosten. Da war meine Antwort: “Das kann ich auch selber machen und das wird noch günstiger!”.

Die Antwort meiner Frau: “Wenn Du ihn zu Hälfte der Kosten machst, dann darfst Du es machen, ansonsten kaufe ich mir den Tisch selber!” … also habe ich mir Paletten besorgt und habe einen ähnlichen Tisch mit Schubladen und Truhe für umgerechnet 60 Euro selber gemacht, wobei den Beschläge alleine schon knapp 40 Euro gekostet haben (nur Material).

Meine Motivation:
Und somit war das Interesse am Holzwerken dann geweckt und es nahm seinen Lauf mit den anderen Projekten, welche ich gemacht habe. Die Herausforderung am Palettenholz sind die vorgegebenen Maße der Bretter. Ich finde es schöner gebrauchte Paletten und Palettenbretter zu verarbeiten und diesem Holz ein zweites Leben zu geben (mit Löchern, Unebenheiten und deren Mängeln, welches dieses
Holz, wenn es gebraucht ist, aufweist) – Neue ungebrauchte Paletten, finde ich uninteressant.

Warum stellst Du Deine Projekte online?

Um anderen Personen zu zeigen, das Palettenholz eigentlich ein wunderschönes Holz sein kann, ob als Truhe, Stuhl, Sessel, Kisten, Tresen oder als Wandbild oder auch als Thron. Ich liebe dieses Holz von Paletten einfach.

Welches Foto-/Video-Equipment benutzt Du und warum? Falls Du Videos machst, wie sieht der typische Entstehungsprozess eines Videos bei Dir aus?

Videos mache ich nicht wirklich (wenn nur als Diashow auf Youtube) die andere Art als Bastelvideo liegt mir nicht, aber Respekt an alle anderen Personen auf Youtube (habe es selber schon versucht und ich
fand mich selber nur blöd weil jeder vierte Satz mit ÄÄÄhmmm oder so angefangen hat.
Ansonsten mache ich nur Fotos und das mit meinem Handy (immer dabei).

Hast Du ein Lieblingswerkzeug? Falls ja, was magst Du daran besonders?

Hmm da muss ich mal drüber nachdenken … Ein Freund meinte nur: “Klausi und sein Akkuschrauber…jetzt geht er in seinem Element wieder auf” … Nachdenken zu Ende …. Nein ich habe kein Lieblingswerkzeug.. ich “liebe” alle meine Werkzeuge, denn jedes meiner Werkzeuge hat seine Funktion und wird von mir nicht nur benutzt sondern auch gepflegt. Mich ärgert es ja schon, wenn ein Beschlag vom Kreissägeblatt sich verabschiedet, weil ich einen Nagel im PalettenBrett erwische, welchen ich vorher übersehen habe.


Wir sagen vielen Dank für Deine Antworten und wünschen weiterhin viel Spass beim Holzwerken!

Patrick – PaddysWoodshop (Community Admin)

Winner (s) of the Project of the month: September 2017

Winner (s) of the Project of the month: September 2017

This month we have two winners and this is just awesome !

Two people, two projects, two stories, but one goal: Music

 

And here they are :

 

Background story by Gero

First in German, further down in English

 

 

Einfach mal ´ne Gitarre bauen, kann ja nicht so schwer sein… 😉 …und so startete das Abenteuer.

Der Korpus besteht aus Ahorn mit aufgeleimtem Bubingafurnier, mit der Stichsäge grob zurechtgesägt und mit der Oberfräse und allerlei Schleifgerätschaften in Form gebracht. Für die Aussparungen der Halsaufnahme, Tonabnehmer und Elektronikfach fertigte ich eine Schablone und probierte einfach mal aus wie so ein Kopierring für die Oberfräse funktioniert… aufregend…aber es hat geklappt 🙂

Die Rückseite und die Kanten lackierte ich mit verschiedenen braunen Candy-Lasuren und verpasste dem Ganzen eine schöne Schicht 2K Klarlack.
Das Pickguard und die Abdeckungen der Tonabnehmer wollte ich ursprünglich auch aus Holz fertigen, entschied mich dann aber aus Stabilitätsgründen für Kunststoffteile, auf die ich mit Hilfe der Airbrushtechnik eine Wurzelholzoptik lackierte.

Den Hals hatte ich noch von einer ausgeschlachteten Billiggitarre, liegt angenehm in der Hand und ist super bespielbar. Also… Kopfplatte umgearbeitet, mit Bubinga furniert, lackiert, Bünde abgerichtet, neuer Sattel… zack fertig.

Dann konnte zusammengebaut, verlötet und justiert werden. Ich finde es immer super spannend wenn aus Einzelteilen ein großes Ganzes wird… Die vergoldete Hardware in Kombination mit der hellen Wurzel und dem rotbraunen Body… schon ein Bisschen sexy. Ich muss gestehen das ich recht überrascht war das alles halbwegs passt und funktioniert und nur wenige Nacharbeiten nötig waren.

Zur Elektronik: Die Tonabnehmer sind von Fender und die Schaltung ist Standard Stratocaster, also 5-Wegeschalter, Volumen-Poti und 2x Tone-Poti .

Fazit: Einiges würde ich mittlerweile anders machen aber alles in allem bin ich mit dem Ergebnis zufrieden. Viel gelernt, Spiel, Spaß & Spannung beim Werken gehabt und eine Gitarre mit herrlichem Blues/Rock-Sound gab es auch noch.

Beste Grüße
Gero

 

 

 

 

Simply building a guitar, that can´t be too hard 😉 and so the adventure started.
The corpus is out of maple with bubinga veneer glued on, cutted out with the jigsaw and with the router and all sorts of sanding equipment brought into form. For the cutouts of the neck, pickup and the electronics I made a template and just tried how a cam ring for the router works … exciting … but it worked well 🙂
I painted the back and the edges with different brown candy-glazes and gave it a nice finish with 2K clearcoat. In the beginning, I wanted to make the pickguard and the cover for the pickups out of wood, but for stability reasons I decided to use plastic pieces that I finished with airbrush techniques so it looks like root wood.
I had the neck from a exploited cheap guitar, it feels very comfy and is nice to play with. So, headplate adjusted, veneered with bubinga, painted, set everything … and done.
Then everything could be sticked together, soldet and adjusted. I always find it very tensioning when single pieces combine to a big whole. The golden hardware in combination with the bright root and the redbrown body … kind of sexy. I have to admit that I was very surprised that everything worked well and I only had to make a few adjustments.
Regarding the electronics: the pickups are from Fender and the gearing is Standard Stratocaster, so 5-way-switch, volume-poti and 2x tone-poti.
Conclusion: Something I would have made differently now but all in all I am satisfied with the result. Learned a lot, had fun and tension building it and got a nice guitar with Blues/Rock-Sound.

Best Regards
Gero

_______________________________________________________________________

 

 

Background story by Luca

 

 

Building violins is my job.

For violins the materials are quite standard: red Italian spruce for the top, Curly maple for the back, ribs and neck+scroll, normal maple for the bridge, ebony for all the other parts (fingerboard, pegs, tailpiece, endpin, nut and saddle).
You can find violin backs and ribs made of poplar or other wood as well. Boxwood and rosewood is also frequently used for the parts I made of ebony, except for the fingerboard, which is always ebony.

No machines were used for this project. I just used the bandsaw to cut out the most of the waste before start carving the top and the back. All the tools are manual: little planes with arched and flat bottom, rasps, files, chisels and gouges. Not many tools really. For the bending of the ribs I use a hot iron and water. The joint of the two pieces of the top and the back are always hand planed to perfection, so that you can’t see it and there’s no gap, so the glue won’t fail in hundreds of years.

I started with carving the scroll, you basically draw the outline on a block of maple that you (hand) planed square and carve with a saw, gauges and files.
Than you join two bookmatched pieces for the back and the top (sometimes the back is one piece), draw the outline of the violin with a model, cut out the waste with a coping saw or bandsaw or watever saw that can cut curves. After you cut out the waste you get to the line with rasps and files and start carving the top and bottom with planes. Some use gouges. Than you cut a little groove (1,3mm usually) near the borders to install the purfling, and you start carving on the inside. The thickness you leave will affect the sound.
Then you shape the ribs with water and a hot iron, glue them together, glue the bottom to the ribs and the top on the other side.
To join the body and the neck a sliding dovetail is used, and it has to be cut by hand because every neck will be different and the angle you put the neck in is important, and can variate on every instrument.

I’m very satisfied as the violin sounds great and i quite like the slightly used look it has.

For photos of the building of my violins you can visit my website: http://www.lucazerilli.com

Link to this particular violin:
http://www.lucazerilli.com/index.php/en/12-violins/15-violin-3.html

Luca Zerilli

Project of the month: September 2017

Project of the month: September 2017

This is the fifth post of our monthly series “Project of the month”.

This month will be musical !

The vote will run for about a week and then we’re going to announce the project of the month. The winning maker will give you some behind-the-scences information about the project.

You can bring projects to our attention in two different ways:

We’re going to choose from those nominations but we can’t guarantee that any of them will come up in a vote because we have no idea how many projects will be sent in. The projects don’t have to be posted in that particular month.

_______________________________________________________________________

So for September 2017, here are the three candidates

gero_kreatech: my first guitar

lucazerilliluthier: new antique-looking violin

paoson_woodworking: Les Paul guitar

 

Which of the following projects is your Project of the Month (September 2017)
  • gero_kreatech: my first guitar 43%, 9 votes
    9 votes 43%
    9 votes - 43% of all votes
  • lucazerilliluthier: antique-looking violin 43%, 9 votes
    9 votes 43%
    9 votes - 43% of all votes
  • paoson_woodworking: Les Paul guitar 14%, 3 votes
    3 votes 14%
    3 votes - 14% of all votes
Total Votes: 21
24.09.2017 - 07.10.2017
Voting is closed
© Kama